Collins/Endicott

Jackie Collins (left) and Yolanda Endicott (right)

RADFORD — Charges from an attempt to deliver heroin and methamphetamine to jail inmates ended with plea agreements Friday in Radford Circuit Court, and a West Virginia man and woman were fined and sentenced to serve six months behind bars.

Yolanda Jo Endicott, 42, of Beckley, West Virginia, entered no contest pleas to four felony charges, two of possessing drugs and two of conspiring to deliver those drugs to inmates.

Jackie Lynn Collins, 36, also of Beckley, pleaded guilty to the same charges.

Plea agreements gave Endicott and Collins identical sentences: The drug possession charges were deferred for a year under a first-time-offender program, with the understanding that they will be dismissed if Collins and Endicott each complete 200 hours of community service and a state drug program; the conspiracy charges each brought a sentence of 10 years in prison, with all but six months suspended.

Judge David Malesco, who heard the cases because Radford’s regular circuit judge, Joey Showalter, is on vacation, gave each defendant $1,000 in fines, then suspended $500 for each. He also suspended Collins and Endicott’s drivers licenses for 12 months.

In a summary of the prosecution’s case, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Jason Annis said city police learned of a plan to get drugs to an inmate assigned to work at the city’s animal control facility. An investigator reviewed recorded jail phone calls and learned that Endicott and Collins intended to deliver heroin and meth to the inmate in early January.

When the day of the delivery arrived, officers watched as a white pickup truck with West Virginia tags approached the animal control facility, then quickly departed. Police stopped the truck and found Endicott driving and Collins riding in the passenger seat. Collins admitted he had heroin in his pocket. A search located meth as well. Lab tests confirmed that the substances found were the drugs in question, Annis said.

Defense attorneys Flux Neo of Tazewell, who represented Endicott, and Matt Roberts of Blacksburg, who represented Collins, agreed that Annis gave an accurate summary of the evidence. Endicott told Malesco that yes, Annis had described what had actually happened.

Endicott and Collins told Malesco that with the time served since their arrests, they likely had completed their six month sentences or were close to that amount of time. Endicott said she planned to move in with her daughter. Collins said he would return to West Virginia as quickly as possible, adding that a relative’s mortuary company had a job waiting for him there.

“Good luck , and don’t come back,” Malesco told Collins.

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Mike Gangloff covers crime, breaking news and courts in the New River Valley.

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